Press “Release”

Journalism and writing students are taught to ask the following questions: who, what, when, where, why, and how in their quest for writing a cohesive article or story.

These questions can be helpful as well in the quest of RELEASE!

WHO:

Almost anyone you or I know has some surface or deep-seated issue that needs to be released. It could be a traumatic memory or event. Or it might be a simple but unintentional slight.

For me, it was a statement made to me in my early teens about how I would never amount to anything. It became a self-fulling prophecy and resulted in bad choices. When I decided to release the negativity within me, my life began to change.

WHAT:

Your trauma, bad memory of whatever will control you until you see it for what it is. No one would say releasing these problems is easy. But is carrying around a yoke unhappiness and bitterness doing much for you? If not, determine to find a way to release that burden. Don’t be afraid to seek the help of professionals to help with this process.

Most likely, it didn’t happen overnight and won’t go away overnight.

WHY:

“None Of These Diseases” by S. I. McMillen, M. D. writes of the dis-eases that can attack our body and mind when we hold on to things that harm us, whether relationships, friendships, or fear. Crippling arthritis is just one side effect of not releasing that which harms us. Who hasn’t had headaches, stomach issues, and/or hives as a result of fear? I have.

WHERE:

Any time, any place or point in life is a good time to release, to let go of that which doesn’t serve you, mentally, physically, and spiritually. For me, I write in a journal. The act of putting the words on paper lets me see them for what they are something to be released. A walk by the river, pond, or in a forest park can do wonders in helping the mind to see what needs to be done. Then act on it. I do some of my best thinking as I’m doing the vacuuming or sweeping the floor. Meditation works better for some. Find what works for you and start releasing.

HOW:

A few years ago, I planted ivy at the base of a dogwood tree. At first, it was pretty, clinging to the tree as it began to grip the tree trunk. Then I noticed the tendrils (or claws as I came to think of them) began to grab into the tree’s bark. Limbs began to show the distress of the strength the ivy was taking from the tree. While the ivy was still beautiful, it was slowly taking over the tree. This is how stress takes over our lives and begins to sap the strength we have inside of us. It’s like taking our lifeblood from us and giving it to whatever we are holding onto.

Eventually, I got the ivy off the tree and out of the area. The tree still had some damage but began to recover once the nutrients that had been sapped began to return.

We, too, can recover from whatever it is we’re holding onto if we’re willing to do the work required. No one else can do this for you, and while it’s tempting to try and “fix” others, that’s for them to do when they are ready.

Be aware though; if the “thing” isn’t released, you’ll have to remove the tendrils again if not keenly aware of the insidious nature of the THING that needs to be released. The words spoken over me at a tender age have reared their ugly head when I’ve been low. Then I have to remember who I am and Whose I am.

Namaste

Barbara Hill– Barbara Tubbs Hill

Writer, counselor, perennial student and seeker of truth and spirit is an apt description for Barbara. Currently, Barbara is working on her first novel with two more planned for the future. Her first book, “Let’s Talk, What You Don’t Know About Credit Can Hurt You,” was written after fifteen years in a career than spanned collections, credit and mortgage lending. Barbara is glad to have been a part of getting the Indian Mound in Florence listed on the Alabama State Historical Register and soon the National Historical Registry. She lives in Florence AL with her husband Johnnie and two precious rescue dogs; Snookies and Daisy.

Barbara Hill / BarbaraHillWrites@gmail.com / 256-710-9713

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